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SHARPENING
Intro
Sharpening Safety
Grinding Lathe Chisels
Honing Lathe Chisels
Sharpening Bench Chisels
Grinding Planer and Jointer Knives
Grinding Shaper Cutters
Honing Shaper Cutters and Router Bits
Honing Molder Knives
Honing Lathe Duplicator Cutters
Sharpening Mortising Chisels
Sharpening Mortising Bits

Sharpening Woodworking Tools
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Pg.1-5, Pg. 6-10, Pg 11-15, Pg. 16-20, Pg. 21-25

Honing Lathe Chisels

After the skews, gouges, and parting tools are ground for either shearing or cutting, their cutting edges must be honed razor sharp.

In order to hone the chisel you must be able to find and recognize the burr created by grinding. This must be done properly and with extreme care to avoid cutting yourself. As you progress from coarser to finer stones, the burr will become smaller and more difficult to find, but after you become more practiced at honing this will become second nature.

Click to see larger view
Figure 24-22. Feel the burr by carefully rubbing your finger toward the cutting edge.

To find the burr, lightly rub your finger at right angles to the cutting edge from the back of the bevel toward the cutting edge and across it (Figure 24-22). Warning: Be careful not to slide your finger along the cutting edge. Even though the chisel is not yet honed, the burr is sharp.

Start honing with a coarse stone. Apply a generous amount of liquid (if required) to the surface of the stone. Set the chisel in the center of the hone, and rock the chisel on the bevel until you see the liquid squeeze out from between the ground surface and the stone. This helps to show that you're holding the chisel at the proper angle. Repeat this until you easily feel the bevel seat flat on the stone. Slide the chisel over the hone as directed for each class of hone.

By repeating this procedure on progressively finer stones you will be able to hone the cutting edge of the chisel razor sharp.

There are a couple of tests to check the “sharpness” of the cutting edge: (1) A razor sharp cutting edge will cut end grain of wood with little effort. (2) A razor sharp cutting edge will seem to drag rather than slip when pulled across the corner of a piece of hardwood. Do not use paper to test the sharpness because the glues in the paper will dull the edge you worked so hard to obtain.

Honing the Skew

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Figure 24-23. Point the cutting edge in the same direction you are sliding the skew.

The skew is honed much like a pocket knife. Each has a bevel ground on both sides of their cutting edge. The skew must be honed on the two bevels. This will remove the grinding burr and sharpen the cutting edge. By repeating this procedure on progressively finer stones you will be able to hone the cutting edge razor sharp.

Using Oil Stones and Diamond Hones--Hold one bevel of the skew on the hone. Slide the skew over the hone with the cutting edge pointing in the same direction you are sliding the skew (Figure 24-23). Think of it as trying to shave off a thin sliver of the hone. Turn the skew over and repeat the procedure to hone the other bevel.

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Figure 24-24. For narrow chisels, point the cutting edge away from the direction you are sliding the skew.

Using Water Stones and Rubber Bonded Abrasives--To hone skews with a cutting edge wider than 1/2" follow the oil stones and diamond hones instructions.

For skews with narrower cutting edges, slide the skew over the hone with the cutting edge pointing away from the direction you are sliding the skew (Figure 24-24). Think of it as trying to smooth over the surface of the hone. Turn the skew over and repeat the procedure to hone the other bevel.

Honing the Gouge
The gouge must be honed on both the bevel ground on the outside and the concave inside. This will remove the grinding burr and sharpen the cutting edge.

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Figure 24-25. Point and roll the outside of the cutting edge in the same direction you are pushing the gouge.

A gouge slip or other rounded (convex) slip will be needed to hone the inside (concave) of the gouge. This medium or fine slip should match the profile of the gouge as close as possible.

Using Oil Stones and Diamond Hones--Hold the bevel of the gouge on the hone. Roll the gouge as you push it over the hone. The cutting edge should be pointing in the same direction you are pushing the gouge (Figure 24-25). Think of it as trying to shave off a thin sliver of the hone as you roll the gouge.

 

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Figure 24-26. Use a rounded slip to hone the inside of the gouge.

Change to the slip. Apply a generous amount of oil to the inside of the gouge. Set the hone in the gouge. Slide the slip from the cutting edge to the handle while rotating the gouge so the entire cutting edge on the inside is honed (Figure 24-26). Then return to the flat bench hone.

Using Water Stones and Rubber Bonded Abrasives--Hold the bevel of the gouge on the hone. Roll the gouge as you pull it over the hone. Slide the gouge over the hone with the cutting edge pointing away from the direction you are sliding the gouge (Figure 24-27). Think of it as trying to smooth over the surface of the hone as you roll the gouge.

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Figure 24-27. Point and roll the cutting edge away from the direction you are sliding the gouge.

Change to the water slip hone. Apply a generous amount of water to the top surface of the hone. Set the concave side of the gouge down on the slip. Slide the gouge away from the slip while rotating the gouge so the entire cutting edge is honed on the inside. Then return to the flat bench hone.

Honing the Parting Tool
The parting tool is honed on the bevel ground on both sides of the cutting edge. This will remove the grinding burr and sharpen the cutting edge.

Click to see larger view
Figure 24-28. Point the cutting edge in the same direction you are sliding the tool.

Using Oil Stones and Diamond Hones--Hold the bevel of the parting tool on the hone. Slide the parting tool over the hone with the cutting edge pointing in the same direction you are sliding the tool (Figure 24-28). Think of it as trying to shave off a thin sliver of the hone. Turn the parting tool over and repeat this on the other bevel.

Using Water Stones and Rubber Bonded Abrasives--Hold one bevel of the parting tool on the hone. Slide the tool over the hone with the cutting edge pointing away from the direction you are sliding the tool (Figure 24-29). Think of it as trying to smooth over the surface of the hone. Turn the parting tool over and repeat the procedure to hone the other bevel. Warning: Never attempt to hone the parting tool with the rubber bonded abrasive wheel mounted on the grinding wheel accessory. The cutting edge of the parting tool will dig into the soft abrasive and throw the tool from your hands, possibly causing injury and certainly damaging the tool and the rubber bonded abrasive wheel.

Click to see larger view
Figure 24-29. Point the cutting edge away from the direction you are sliding the tool.

Continue to Sharpening Bench Chisels
Back to Grinding Lathe Chisels

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